Photo

(Source: needlesandnerds)

Photo
thestuntkid:

"Jessine" featuring Jessine Hein
PRINTS

thestuntkid:

"Jessine" featuring Jessine Hein

PRINTS

Photoset

darknessbloodyshadow123:

cloudsinmycoffee9:

this is literally the greatest subtitling job that has ever been done. someone learned how to speak cat.

*laughs irl*

(Source: iraffiruse, via vampmissedith)

Photo

asagi natsume

asagi natsume

(Source: cactuslands, via mentalalchemy)

Quote
"Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched."

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)

if you google “define virgin” it says things like adjective: not yet used, exploited or processed, so yeah stop using that to describe a person (typically a woman) who hasn’t had sex yet

(via peace-be-dreams)

(Source: ynannarising, via peace-be-dreams)

Photoset
Photoset
Photoset

wiitch-craft:

free-vibin:

iloveyoulikekanyeloveskanye:

maybe humans are good for some things

this stuff makes me so happy 

the way the mother looks back at the end 

(Source: sizvideos, via mentalalchemy)

Photoset

nubbsgalore:

jim and jamie dutcher, determined to show “the hidden life of wolves”, lived for six years with a pack of wolves in the idaho wilderness of yellowstone. a constant but unobtrusive presence, the dutchers earned the unshakable trust of the wolves, and came to know them as complex, highly intelligent animals with distinct individual personalities, who are caring, playful and above all devoted to family.

"only a select few other species exhibit these same traits so clearly," they note. "they are capable of not only emotion but also real compassion. this is the view of the wolf that we want to share. …it is an animal that cares for its sick and desperately needs to be part of something bigger than itself - the pack. the bond a wolf has to its pack is certainly as strong as the bond a human being has to his or her family."

they add, “rarely did two wolves pass each other without playfully rubbing shoulders together or exchanging a brief lick. so often we would see two wolves relaxing together, curled up beside each other.” the dutchers also recount wolf behavior rarely documented: grief at the death of a pack mate; excitement over the birth of pups; and the shared role of raising young pack members.

but as the wolves struggle to reestablish their foothold in the american west, their public demonization continues.  say the dutchers, “as we see wolves, once again, being shot, trapped and poisoned, we recognize that our unique experience, living with wolves, is unlikely to ever happen again, and for that reason we feel that we have an obligation to share the lives of these wolves we with the widest audience possible.”

it’s not just the wolves at stake, but the entire yellowstone ecosystem. wolves keep the elk gene pool strong (no other predator does this); they redistribute elk herds, allowing vegetation to recover along rivers and streams, which provides food for beavers; and they keep the number of coyotes in check, which helps to maintain populations of rodents, antelopes and birds of prey. 

(via b----j----c)

Photoset

sakibatch:

jimmys face in the last frame tho omg

(Source: youtube.com, via suziizaz)

Photoset

thatscienceguy:

The Kea; The worlds only snow-inhabiting parrots, they live in the alpine environments of the south island of New Zealand, and they are thought to be the Smartest parrots in the world, so smart that they are put up there with Chimpanzees and Dolphins.

Scientists have set up many puzzles which have determined that Keas are one of the best problem solvers, even when completely wild. Demonstrating group coordination, where one of them would hold open a lever while the other gets the food out, then they share!

Watch this David Attenborough documentary, “Kea - The Smartest Parrot" skip to 6 minutes in if you just want to watch them dismantle puzzles set up by researchers.

They are so smart that they actually get bored with their daily lives of gathering food and making babies, and so they play games, which residents surrounding Mt. Cook despise as it usually involves taking apart cars, TV aerials, and other things that are usually expensive to replace. 

(via suziizaz)

Photoset
Photo
tattrx:

Koray Karagözler - Blue~Violet tattrx.com/artists/koray-karagözler
Photoset

tracksoot:

'Sista Girls' by Bindi Cole

The term ‘Sistagirl’ is used to describe a transgender person in Tiwi Island culture. Traditionally, the term was ‘Yimpininni’.  The very existence of the word provides some indication of the inclusive attitudes historically extended towards Aboriginal sexual minorities. Colonisation not only wiped out many indigenous people, it also had an impact on Aboriginal culture and understanding of sexual and gender expression. As Catholicism took hold and many traditions were lost, this term became a thing of the past. Yimpininni were once held in high regard as the nurturers within the family unit and tribe much like the Faafafine from Samoa. As the usage of the term vanished, tribes’ attitudes toward queer indigenous people began to resemble that of the western world and religious right. Even today many Sistergirls are excluded from their own tribes and suffer at the hands of others.

Within a population of around 2500, there are approximately 50 ‘Sistagirls’ living on the Tiwi Islands. This community contains a complex range of dynamics including a hierarchy (a queen Sistergirl), politics, and a significant history of pride and shame. The Sistagirls are isolated yet thriving, unexplored territory with a beauty, strength and diversity to inspire and challenge.

(via euphoric-wanderer)

Photoset

sharkhugger:

mentalalchemy:

unexplained-events:

Megamouth

No one knew of this shark’s existence until 1976. They are rarely seen in shallow water. There have only been three known recordings and fifty-nine specimen sightings of this shark as of May, 2014.

That first gif blows my mind.

OoO  !!!

(via msras)